Teaching Your Toddler About Feelings

Teaching Your Toddler About Feelings

by Twigtale 

Is your family coping with a loss or a difficult transition? Young children may have a particularly hard time expressing their grief. Sadness and anger are normal after a loss, but most toddlers haven’t developed the language skills necessary to verbalize their feelings.

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Dr. Harvey Karp Explains...

Dr. Harvey Karp Explains...

by Twigtale 

Dr. Harvey Karp, our new Editor-in-Chief, doesn’t just want your toddler to be OK; he wants your toddler to be happy. That’s why Twigtale is thrilled to partner with him! Our highest intention, for our children and yours, is that they be happy.

Since you may be new to Dr. Karp’s breakthrough ideas, we thought we would outline the fundamentals.

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Coping With Anxiety Around Starting Preschool

by Allison Latona, MFT

Summer's end is nearing!  Both you and your kids may be anticipating a new school year, with new teachers and classrooms, or perhaps starting school for the very first time.

The transition to preschool can be filled with excitement and challenge.

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Taking Care of Mom When A New Baby Joins The Family

When a new baby joins the family, naturally your toddler may have a hard time with the transition. But how are YOU adjusting? Emma Jenner, child development and behavioral specialist, reminds us that “now it is paramount that you think about yourself, as well as the baby.” Here are a few tips for an easier transition for Mom.

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How To Explain Death To A Child

by Allison LaTona

Dealing with death is difficult at any age. Specifically, parents often feel great anxiety when they have to explain death to a young child. Many children first experience death when a family pet passes away and how a parent handles this situation can deeply affect a child's sense of security.

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Toddler Tip - Tricky People Are The New Strangers

Traditionally we have taught children not to talk to strangers, but it turns out a child predator is most likely someone your child knows, not a stranger.Therefore, safety expert and Twigtale author, Pattie Fitzgerald recommends:

STRANGER DANGER needs to be replaced with a warning about TRICKY PEOPLE.

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Toddler Tip: Being The BOSS of Your Body (Personal Safety for Young Children)

These tips on teaching your children personal safety are from Pattie Fitzgerald, safety specialist and founder of Safely Ever After. Pattie reminds us that “Being the BOSS means you can tell ANYONE to leave your private parts alone… even a bigger kid or a grownup!  Being the BOSS means you can tell someone else that you won’t touch THEIR private parts, either!”

Kids love being the BOSS and this empowers them to be able to use their voice in any "yucky," uncomfortable situation. Being the BOSS OF YOUR BODY also works on the playground at school, in case another child is being physically aggressive in some way. The BOSS is in charge of THEIR Body!  (Make sure your child knows that they should tell you anytime someone gives them an UH-OH feeling.)

Pattie authored Twigtale's "I'm The Boss of My Body" and has been successfully teaching Child Predator Safety Awareness since 2001.

 

Toddler Tip: Being The BOSS of Your Body (Personal Safety for Young Children) was originally published on June 3, 2014. Modifications to style, arrangement, and linked sources were made on December 10, 2015.